Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Playground Limited

 I cannot understand the reason of imitating the natural world cum attractions, in lieu of outdoor and on-the-spot experience that promotes reverence for life and the environment.

 Dr Abe V Rotor 
Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]


 Artificial playground in a mall, 2015

I cannot smell the earth under my feet, neither the freshness of grass nor the fragrance of  flowers with bees and butterflies hovering, fluttering and alighting for brief rest;

I cannot see birds around; I mistake their songs for whistles and whirls of machines and toys; the singing of cicada, cooing of doves, fiddling of crickets are buried in noise;

I cannot feel the softness of grass, soothing to tired feet, the presence of plants, quivering of their leaves with the slightest touch, towering trees that lead my eyes to heaven;

I cannot hear water moving downstream among rocks, hissing of a waterfall, stream  settling down in peace and quiet, calming frayed nerves and tired muscles; 

I cannot imagine how grownups and children are united in an artificial ambiance, by time limited by toll, off limit signs, warnings and many rules that limit freedom and choice; 

I cannot imagine animals in their stuffed replicas being treated by kids in different ways, consciously or otherwise, if such attitude applies to growing up in a natural world;   

I cannot relate beautiful experiences with Nature, richness of imagination, logical thoughts and inferences where the playground is a patchwork lacking contiguity and goal;    

I cannot hear thunder in the distance that bring in life-givng rain that nourishes the forests, pastures and fields, that signals the kids playing to pack up and go home; 
 
I cannot understand the reason of imitating the natural world cum attractions, in lieu of  outdoor and on-the-spot experience that promotes reverence for life and the environment. 

 
Transforms  -  artificial replicas for study. Do these contribute 
to growing up in a natural world?  

Riding on the Wind - Two Liners for Everyday Living (Series 1)


You can't tell where a sailboat goes
without keel, more so as the wind blows.

Dr Abe V Rotor 
Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]



 Sailboats pass the ruins of a lighthouse, detail of a mural by the author. 


Now and then I jot ideas as they come spontaneously at work, leisure and even in the middle of the night.

Ideas are fleeting, they just disappear and are difficult to recall. Fortunately, with a notebook on hand, I was able to capture and transcribed them painstakingly into two-line verses. 


Here are some I wish to share in this blog and on Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-the-air) 


1. Wind, current, keel make a trio. 
only if they have one direction to go.

2. Love is sweeter after pain,
and perhaps never sweeter again. 

 3. Truthfulness sans kindness is like a cold, cruel steel;
kindness sans truthfulness is like a forgotten window sill.

4. That others will learn to trust you,
first, be trustworthy, kind and true.  

5. The greatest crisis ambitious men and women face
is loss of privacy trying to win a nameless race. 

6. When reality dies, it may become a dream,
and dream is reality again foreseen.


7. Kindness, however small,
is never wasted at all.

8.Patience is a virtue in disguise,
the art of the smart and wise. 

9. He who always says, "Yes".
is seeker of convenience,

10. It is always the big fish that got away, 
is an old story.  Lo! to the innocent prey.  


11. Unless cut and polished, a stone is stone,
like a gene lying deep, unknown and alone.

12. Ah, but what good is a rock when it misses
the essence of a clay on which life itself rises? ~

Definitions (By Jacob M Braude)
Miracle: Something that someone does that cannot be done. 
Obstacles: those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off the goal.
Nervousness: when you feel in a hurry all over and can't get started. 
Old Maid: a woman in the prim of life.

Behind Bars in the Mind - Two-liners for Everyday Living (Series 3)

 A problem easily solved
Often returns unresolved.



Now and then I jot down ideas as they come spontaneously at work, leisure and even in the middle of the night. 

Ideas are fleeting, they just disappear and are difficult to recall.  Fortunately, with a notebook at hand, I was able to capture  and transcribed them painstakingly into two-line verses. 

Here are some I wish to share in this blog and on Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-the-air) 

1. A boy gets to be a man when a man is needed;
A man gets to be a boy in times unheeded.

2. Beauty seen once may break many hearts,
That heal soon enough as the image departs.

3. To endure the pain of hatred,
A leader’s wisdom often dared.
 

4. Only good wine grows mellow with age;
So does a good man into a sage.

5. Beauty builds upon beauty,
Ad infinitum to eternity.

6. The past may leave remnants to the future,
New to the young while dying bit by bit.



7. On some mountain top, one’s echo is clear and loud;
In the market place it dies, so in any crowd.

8. A clenched fist softens under a blue sky,
Like high waves, after tempest, die.

9. If a little in me dies if only someone must live,
Here then, Lord, here is my whole life to give.

10. The man that you see today
Was the child of yesterday.
------------------------------------------------------
The wind whistles a wild song through the trees
Before it settles into a breeze.
------------------------------------------------------

11. He who nods when old is wise and deep,
Save he by the fireside asleep.



12. How seldom, if at all, do we weigh our neighbors
The way we weigh ourselves with the same favors.

13. We say we do not have the time, is an alibi
To indolence and loafing, letting time pass by.



14. Ephemeral are the ways of our lives
Watching not the sun to set and rise.

15. Yield or refuse, a woman is delighted,
Silence her excuse to decide instead.

16. Virtues suddenly dawn upon him,
Who, behind bars, hears a mournful chime.

17. Passion and lust to a prodigal son,
After the desert blooms, it returns to sand.

18. If the world is going to end either in fire or ice,
Altogether we die once – not twice.

 
Atacama Desert in bloom

19. What is more mean than envy or indolence
But the two themselves riding on insolence?

20. The worst persecution is one of the mind;
That of the body it can undermine.
Acknowledgement: Internet photos

Sunset of "Gypsy Life"


 About 11 million people worldwide, and about a million in the United States, belong to an ethnic group known as the Roma or Romani. They are more commonly called Gypsies or travelers.  The Roma people migrated to Europe from India about 1,500 years ago. 

 Dr Abe V Rotor 
Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]




Mang Juan poses with his travelling cariton pulled by a bullock, 2015. 

Gypsy - that's the medieval term to describe the unique ethnic life of a  people, mainly the Romani, and other tribes as well that led a nomadic lifestyle, selling wares, entertaining people and "camping" in their carts along their indefinite route.

They had laws and rules of their own, keeping their unity and preserving their culture, which the outside world barely understood as to regard them integrated into the main stream of society.  But they were not, and in fact they were persecuted like the Jews.

If there is such a thing as "wandering Jews" who were deprived of their country and discriminated as Jews, the gypsies too were treated the same.  Many of them died under Nazi rule in WW II, and their number was decimated - yet they carried on.

In fact, any lifestyle in any country that is similar in some respects with the life of a gypsy is automatically given a name as such - gypsy, as if it is a universal connotation, although it may be a far cry from the true and original gypsy culture.

Yes, basically the gypsy is nomadic, but the later gypsies built homes and communities of their own, where they enjoyed a sense of belonging and loyalty to  their unique culture. Today all over the world they are being integrated into the mainstream of society. 

Beliefs that they can foretell the future with crystal balls and tarot cards remain as signature of gypsies, historically their main trade. Costumes speak at a glance the identity a gypsy lady like Esmeralda, the gypsy in Victor Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 

In the novel, Esmeralda ignited clash beween rich and poor, exposed social ills of medieval France.  Her sensual physical attributes became the object of lust, greed and murder. On the other hand, she also gained sympathy and compassion - on behalf of her own people.  

There are no true gypsies in the Philippines, and if there is any, they are the like of Mang Juan who earns a living by ambulant selling of native crafts, from broom to hammock, native furniture to kitchen utensils. His trade route is Pangasinan to Manila, a distance of 300 km.     

Call it aculturation or cultural integration, globalization in the larger sense. Acceptance from the top and adaptation from below - and aggrupation.  How wide the gap exists, is a challenge to society.  While this is key to integration, there is equally a potential repercussion, and danger - the loss of diversity which is the biggest threat to mankind in our postmodern times.~        
 
        Gypsy families on the move prepared to camp for the night; Gypsy performing art is world renown.Their music, dance and costume are distinctly unique.

Monday, May 30, 2016

Dust in my Room - Two-liners for Everyday Living (Series 2)


Nobly a life men can choose,
Yet prefer to live long and lose.


Dr Abe V Rotor


Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]



Now and then I jot ideas as they come spontaneously at work, leisure and even in the middle of the night.

Ideas are fleeting, they just disappear and are difficult to recall. Fortunately, with a notebook on hand, I was able to capture and transcribed them painstakingly into two-line verses. 


Here are some I wish to share in this blog and on Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-the-air) 


1. Take it from the ant or stork,
Patience is silence at work.
 

2. A full vessel holds water to the brim,
Unless it bears a crack on the rim.

3. Pleasance to the youth, care to the old;
Where do they belong, the meek and the bold?

4. She is coy who speaks soft, writes light;
Fire starts with smoke before it ignites.

5. Moth, master of camouflage, don’t be dumb;
When you lose your art, you lose your freedom.

6. He finds reason for living
Who sees a new beginning.

7. Every promise you can’t keep
Drags you into a deeper pit.

8. How do you know truth unspoken?
When the heart has spoken.

9. To the humble, a Genie rises from a great soul,
And I, a teacher, yet know not my goal.

10. Make believe growth and prosperity;
A vessel sounds louder when empty.

11. A child too soon behaves like man,
A good man, he means – on none.

12. The difference of being right and reasonable,
One is black or white, the other’s measurable
----------

Definition (From Jacob M Baude)

Gratitude: Memory of the heart.
Dreams: the free movies of sleep
Luck: good planning, carefully executed
Kindness: a language which the deaf can hear and the blind can read.

Witty Humor - Key to Cheerful Disposition


Researched and edited by Dr Abe V Rotor
Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]




1.  Authorship 

An English teacher, having read some of John Milton's poetry to her young class one day, mentioned to them that the great poet was blind.  One question asked on the examination the next  day was:

Milton
"What was Milton's great affliction?"


On one paper was scribbled, simply: "He was a poet."


2. Statistics

 "What are the chances of my recovering, doctor?"

"One hundred per cent.  Medical records show that nine out of ten die of the disease which you have, Yours in the tenth case I've treated. The others all died.  So you see, you're bound to get well.  Statistics are statistics."

3. Romance

A shapely young girl had just married a man of wealth who was more than twice her age.

"I don't believe in these May and December marriages," declared a critical friend.

"Why not?" asked the bride.

"Well, said the friend.  "December is going to find in May the youth, beauty and freshness of spring, but what is May going to find in December?"

The bride's logical answer was, "Santa Claus."

4. A Fisherman's Lament

A three-pound pull, and a five-pound bite; an eight-pound jump, and a ten-pound fight; a twelve-pound bend to your pole - but alas!  When you got him aboard he's a half-pound bass.  

FISHERMAN: "I tell you it was THAT long!  I never saw such a fish."
FRIEND: "I believe you."

5.  Age

The young co-ed brought a friend home from college, an extremely attractive curvaceous honey-blonde. 

Introducing her friend to her grandfather, the girl added: "And just think, Beverly, he's in his nineties.

"Early nineties, that is," the old gent added. 

-------------------------------

TOASTS

Drink! for you know not when you come, nor why;
Drink! for you know not why you go, nor where.
                                                                     - Omar Khayyam

Here is to Life! The first half is ruined by our parents and the second half by our children.
 

Acknowledgement: Speaker's Encyclopedia of Humor by Jacob M Baude; Philippine Literature Today, by Rotor AV and KM Doria

Signature of time passing.

 Dr Abe V Rotor
Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]


How time flies, we hear people say;
maybe, but it leaves something:
like first smile, first word, first step, ,
each a signature of time passing.

 Weaning leaves the infant behind. 

First birthday is full of love and affection.

From the confines of home to the open arms of Nature.

Bridging three generations in a row.

Youngest visitor suspends work momentarily.  
 Ate na si Mackie

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Excellence is next to Perfection


Anyone who stops learning is old, whether this happens at twenty or at eighty.

Dr. Abe V Rotor
 Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]


In response to several requests, I am writing down this third part of Excellence.  The first and second part are posted in this blog. 

Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian man, circa 1490 is also called the Canon of Proportions or Proportions of Man. The drawing is based on the correlations of ideal human proportions with geometry described by the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius who described the human figure as being the principal source of proportion among the Classical Orders of architecture.
1. "There is more to life than increasing speed." (Mahatma Gandhi)
"Haste makes waste,"  Stop-look-listen, has saved many lives. "He who runs fast cannot see the countryside." "Who walks fast gets a stabbing wound." "Stop before you reach deadend." These are some lessons I learned early from my dad.
I remember a story about a trader driving a cart loaded with coconuts for the market.
"How can I get there quickly?" he asked an old man on his way.
"Just go slow." quipped the old man.

"Foolish old man," he muttered and galloped on the dirt road.  The nuts spilled and rolled, he had to stop now and then to retrieve his nuts.  He reached the market late.

 2. We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing.
Novelist Ernest Hemingway's favorite photo is one showing him kicking an empty can on the road, football style.

The lost pilot in Antoine de Saint-Exupery's novelette, The Little Prince, found company with a  "little prince"  in the desert while trying to repair his plane.  The child turned out to the little child in oneself, the one who never grows old, who never loses hope and idealism. It is this child that enabled him to go back to civilization.

3. Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we share it with others. 


And if that possession is more than its material value such happiness or love or compassion, it does not only double but will multiply every time we share it with others.  Good deeds defy mathematical law. Kindness, in fact is the highest wisdom. (Talmud)

What makes Gone with the Wind an all-time top grosser is its superb portrayal of human frailties that continue to haunt us.

4. "Although the world is very full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it." Helen Keller)  

Helen Keller was blind since infancy.  She rose to fame to become one of the world's greatest women - author, teacher, philosopher - and proved that no infirmity in a person can prevent him or her to live fully and be of service to others. 

Many great men and women were able to overcome their own limitations.  Beethoven was totally deaf when he wrote his musical masterpieces. Claude Monet was losing his sight when his painted Water Lilies, his ultimate masterpiece in huge murals. We know of people around us who succeeded in life in spite of their sufferings.  Suffering to them  could be the compelling reason for success.  They took the least trodden path of life that is most challenging, yet the most rewarding. 

5. Anyone who stops learning is old, whether this happens at twenty or at eighty.

People struggle to learn to earn, to earn to learn, but the most difficult is to learn to learn.
If we do not open the door to knowledge, the world closes and leaves us behind. 

6. In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life. It goes on(Robert Frost) In fact it is Frost's theme in many of his poems such as Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening, which ends with this stanza. 


                                          The woods are lovely dark and deep,

                                                  But I have promises to keep,
                                          And miles to go before I sleep, 
                                               and miles to go before I sleep. 

7.  "From the errors of others a wise man corrects his own." Publilus Syrus

This is not often the case.  Developing countries follow the path of industrialization of advanced country and commit the same mistakes. There are more broken families today than before, and in fact, increasing.  

8. When opportunity knocks, some people are in the backyard looking for four-leaf clovers.

Many people take the four-lobed clover leaf as a symbol of good luck like marrying a rich guy, winning the Lotto's jackpot, stumbling on a gold mine. Mother luck is one-in-a-million chance, a castle in the sky, a wish come true in a falling star.

Luck is opportunity you take by the horn, so to speak. it is the fruit of labor.  Or one we read on a jeepney, "Katas ng pawis," a reward from perspiration.  Or "Katas ng Saudi" (Oversea's earning)   
I pulled a joke on my students in a field lecture, "Whoever can pick an unfolded leaf of makahiya (Mimosa) will find his or her wish come true." Meantime I took a rest under a tree.   
                                                           Mimosa pudica (makahiya)

9. To some people truth is not only stranger than fiction, but it's a total stranger. 

A survey revealed that more and more Americans believe the Holy Bible as fiction. Others, to the extreme, detached themselves from organized religions.  They call themselves nones.  

I remember a story of two friends. One said, "I don't belief in a God." Evidently he is an atheist.
"Oh, I see!" quipped the other, as they continued walking on the golf range.

The sky was heavy.  Suddenly a bolt of lightning cracked nearby. The atheist automatically crossed himself and mentioned God.   

"I thought you don't believe in God." 
"Reflex action, lang yan."~


Ignorance is false reflection of truth. (UST Fountain of Knowledge)
10. Nothing makes an argument more interesting than ignorance.
A debate may go on and on in the name of justice and honesty and love, ad infinitum. And quite often, ignorance hides under the skirt of Motherhood Statements where no one appears to be wrong. And truth becomes more difficult to find.

Argument for the sake of finding the truth tells us why Socrates, the father of philosophy and the most revered citizen of Athens in "the glory that was Greece"  was condemned to die.   Why Aesop, father of fables - moralism in animal stories - was pushed to his death from a cliff?    Ignorance is truly dangerous. the enemy of truth. It is not falsehood. ~
In the list of the world's best political novels are Tolstoy's War and Peace and Rizal's Noli Me Tangere. Excellence has its own time and often accompanies a great idea whose time has yet to

Fish Evolution


Dr Abe V Rotor

Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]

 
                                              Fish Evolving in acrylic by the author
                                            Stranded Fish in a Rock Pool in acrylic by the author

Fish, what made you fish, not another,
      when choice was in your hand?
Fish answers: Paleozoic a time of fire,
      and my forebears moved from land.

Through Nature's mysterious ways,
      in the shallow seas trapped inland
I remained, while my kin returned to land,
      and became reptilian and mammalian. ~

Friday, May 27, 2016

Anecdotes of Great Men and Women - Self-Adminstered Test

If you are presented with a simple problem that has a simple solution, instead of wasting time and resources, they say, “Cut the Gordian Knot.”

Dr Abe V Rotor
Answers below.

Living with Nature - School on Blog [avrotor.blogspot.com]
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid (People's School-on-Air) with Ms Melly C Tenorio
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday [www.pbs.gov.ph]



1. Story telling is an art. Strive for the “state-of-the-art of story telling”

2. Rhett Butler played by Clark Gable had this famous line, “Frankly my dear I don’t give a damn.” What movie title Gone with the Wind.
Alexander
3. There is a famous statement that captures how powerful Rome was at its height. “All roads lead to Rome.”
Alexander the Great

4. England became the biggest empire in 18th century and had colonies all over the world – India, Australia, US, Canada, to name the most important. There is a famous statement which says, “The sun never sets on English soil.”

5. This is one element of a good anecdote that stimulates the intellect, sagacity, understanding. It shows cleverness. Wit.

6. This is another element of good story that lifts the spirit, and brings man towards optimistic goals. Inspirational

7. Bato bato sa langit …. Doesn’t speak well of a good story. This refers to fatalism.


8. Avoid this aspect in story telling, promoting an idea, thing or person. Propagandism.

9. This is one aspect we should avoid in story telling: directly imposing a norm or moral obligation. Moralism
Columbus

10. It took this man to convince four kings to support his plan to reach East if he goes strait West – thus he name the island he first landed as East Indies. Christopher Columbus.

11. If you are presented with a simple problem that has a simple solution instead of wasting time and resources, they say, “Cut the Gordian Knot.” Who first showed it this way by cutting the complicated Gordian Knot with one slash of his sword.


12. He is known even to the present as the “man of the masses” who at one instance promoted a engineer on the spot. Ramon Magsaysay.


13. The most loved anecdote teller of all time. His anecdotes and anecdotes about him are known all over the world. Abraham Lincoln.

14. He took the crown from the hands of the Pope who was about to crown him, and crowned himself. Napoleon Bonaparte. (photo)


15. This is the Lady with a Lamp who made her rounds in the hospital with a tiny lamp. Florence Nightingale

16. Emperor, a city was named after him, whose mother was a Christian in disguise, latter became liberal ti Christian in practicing their faith. Constantine, the Great

17. English admiral, ordered by his superior not to proceed in his mission because the enemy ships are waiting. He took the telescope and trained it on his right eye which is blind, and said, “I can’t see the enemy sir.” National British hero. Horatius Nelson.
Nelson

18. He isolated himself in his room for days, eating but little, and when he emerge, his face lighted like that of a saint, and holding his masterpiece Hallelujah. Who is this composer. Handel
Beethoven
19. He attended a concert which played his masterpiece. At the end, the audience stood to pay respect to the composer. Someone had to signal him to acknowledge. Ludwig Van Beethoven

Rizal

20. This flying insect circled the a lamp from which Rizal used it as symbol of martyrdom. Moth


Trivia: One of the most famous meetings in history. US newsman Stanley was sent to Africa to search for Dr. David Livingstone. What was Stanley’s greeting? "Dr. Living- stone, I suppose?"

Acknowledgement: Internet photos